Review: 25 Things They Should have Taught you in Medic School … But Didn’t

25 Things They Should Have Taught you in Medic School ... But Didnt (Amazon link)  is the 3rd ebook by EMT, blogger, and social media evangilist Dave Konig. Dave is also the network admin for all of the blogs on the EMS Blogs network.

25 Things is Dave’s best writing effort to date. In this interesting and entertaining book I hear Dave’s voice and see the scenes he is painting with his words. Perhaps my street experience helps, but I find that Dave gave just enough details to help me feel as if I am in the apartment with a COPD patient or riding in the back of the ambulance with him when a patient asks for a band-aid.

Dave’s treatment of the best and worst of EMS is fair and balanced. As other reviewers have said he isn’t attempting to scare newbies out of EMS, or shower us with his heroic brilliance. Each of the 25 things is well explained and Dave combines his observations from nearly 20 years of field experience, with keen industry insights, and relevant research and news.

The book is a quick read and packed with information. I recommend it for both EMT and paramedic students (both “medics” using Dave’s definition), new graduates, and veterans of the profession. Dave includes links to lots of relevant EMS industry websites and articles.

In future editions, I imagine Dave will continue to apply his technical savvy by including photos, adding a number to each chapter heading (I would have liked to know how far into the list of 25 things I was as I read), and links to multimedia content.

If you have a chance to meet Dave “In Real Life” (IRL) you will appreciate that he has the same down to earth mannerisms and matter of fact tone as he writes in the book. The next closest thing might be to listen to his recent interview on the Medical Author Chat podcast.

Thanks Dave for sharing your insights and lessons learned with the profession.

Have you read 25 Things They Should have Taught you in Medic School? Share your comments below and make sure you review the book on Amazon.com for Dave. Your comments and star ratings help him promote the book and prepare future editions.

Note: I was given a free copy of the ebook by the author. 

Interview: 2 Weeks a Year Author Trent Cherin


In this episode of the Medical Author Chat Trent Cherin tells us about his book 2 Weeks a Year: Finding Humor while Deployed in Iraq which is about his deployment to Iraq as an Army National Guard Medic. Unlike most authors being a medic wasn’t something Trent did full-time. Rather it was something he did away from his normal work because he enjoyed helping others and being part of the National Guard. He describes being a medic as “a nice break.”

2 Weeks a Year is a chronicle of Trent’s 548 total days of deployment. Much of which he spent on a base in Iraq just north of Baghdad. The book was put together from photos and emails he sent to family and friends during his deployment. He also wrote the book as a way to remember his experience.

EMS Week Special: Trent is graciously offering a free download of 2 Weeks a Year from Amazon for the Kindle e-reader or Kindle app during EMS Week 2012. This download is only available from midnight Sunday to midnight Tuesday. Make sure to take advantage of this opportunity to download the book.

Connect with Trent on Twitter.com/trent1k1 or LinkedIn.com.

Book Review: 2 Weeks a Year

I posted a review for 2 Weeks a Year Finding Humor in Iraq at Everyday EMS Tips. I enjoyed this book and have an interview scheduled with the author.

Book: 2 Weeks a Year? Finding Humor while deployed to Iraq

While aimlessly browsing through the books available in the Kindle owner’s lending library I found 2 Weeks a Year?. (Amazon Affiliate Link)

The cover photo, of a soldier in front of an Army ambulance, caught my eye. After reading the free preview I learned the author, Trent Cherin, was a combat medic deployed to Iraq. I am now quickly reading through SSG Cherin’s stories that were originally written for friends and family. I am enjoying his first person account and looking forward to reading the complete book.

The sub-genre of Iraq war EMS literature is one of my favorites. Other books I have read include:

What other titles should I read in this genre?