Podcast: Interview with Steven Kanarian author of the “Downwind Walk”

In this episode of the Medical Author Chat I talk with Steven Kanarian – paramedic, educator, and friend – about his book The Downwind Walk: A USAR Paramedics Experiences after the Terrorist Attacks on September 11, 2001 .

 

This episode of the Medical Author Chat is sponsored by EMS Manager. Try out a free trial at EMSManager.net

Steve and I have a great talk about his career in NYC EMS and his eventual work as an EMS Lieutenant in Fire Department of New York EMS until 2009. Steve spent 14 years on the USAR Task Force 1 and deployed to both attacks on the World Trade Center. Steve shared the impact of writing the book to grapple with his own traumatic stress after the events of 9/11. Steve states that he has used “journaling as a tool for stress management since the 1980’s” and that he was writing notes while at Ground Zero.

Self-Publishing

Steve chose self-publishing for the Downwind Walk so he could “tell my story, my way.” He encourages other writes to “just start” by keeping a jounral or blogging. Start with simple stories that draw on life experiences.

Show Links

 

Review: 25 Things They Should have Taught you in Medic School … But Didn’t

25 Things They Should Have Taught you in Medic School ... But Didnt (Amazon link)  is the 3rd ebook by EMT, blogger, and social media evangilist Dave Konig. Dave is also the network admin for all of the blogs on the EMS Blogs network.

25 Things is Dave’s best writing effort to date. In this interesting and entertaining book I hear Dave’s voice and see the scenes he is painting with his words. Perhaps my street experience helps, but I find that Dave gave just enough details to help me feel as if I am in the apartment with a COPD patient or riding in the back of the ambulance with him when a patient asks for a band-aid.

Dave’s treatment of the best and worst of EMS is fair and balanced. As other reviewers have said he isn’t attempting to scare newbies out of EMS, or shower us with his heroic brilliance. Each of the 25 things is well explained and Dave combines his observations from nearly 20 years of field experience, with keen industry insights, and relevant research and news.

The book is a quick read and packed with information. I recommend it for both EMT and paramedic students (both “medics” using Dave’s definition), new graduates, and veterans of the profession. Dave includes links to lots of relevant EMS industry websites and articles.

In future editions, I imagine Dave will continue to apply his technical savvy by including photos, adding a number to each chapter heading (I would have liked to know how far into the list of 25 things I was as I read), and links to multimedia content.

If you have a chance to meet Dave “In Real Life” (IRL) you will appreciate that he has the same down to earth mannerisms and matter of fact tone as he writes in the book. The next closest thing might be to listen to his recent interview on the Medical Author Chat podcast.

Thanks Dave for sharing your insights and lessons learned with the profession.

Have you read 25 Things They Should have Taught you in Medic School? Share your comments below and make sure you review the book on Amazon.com for Dave. Your comments and star ratings help him promote the book and prepare future editions.

Note: I was given a free copy of the ebook by the author. 

New Book Announcement: Wading into the Chaos

Wading into the Chaos (Amazon link) was released on December 30, 2012. The book was written by paramedic Bob Holdsworth.

From the Amazon.com book description:

“Wading Into Chaos, written by a veteran paramedic, gives you a first hand, real life glimpse inside the chaotic world of Emergency Medical Services. Ride along and experience the emotions, the frustration, the sadness and the dark humor that accompanies responding to fatal car crashes, 14-year-old suicides, inner city gang violence, train accidents, med-e-vac helicopter landings, and the forgotten elderly who just need someone to talk to.”

I hope to schedule Bob for an episode soon.

Podcast: Interview with Matthew Sias Author of Silent Siren

This episode of the Medical Author was with Matthew Sias, author of Silent Siren: Memoirs of a Life-saving Mortician (Amazon link).

Matthew started in Fire and EMS as an explorer with the Bainbridge Island Fire  Department 1989. He went on to become and EMT and a paramedic, including training in the King County Medic 1 program. Matthew, currently a paramedic with Central Skagit Medic 1, has also been a reserve police officer, coroner, mortician, and death investigator.

During the conversation Matthew shares that most of the book is about his paramedic experience, but that he weaves in his different roles. Co-host, Brian Lilley, asked Matt to read several passages of the book about Matthew’s different roles.

Matthew shares his process for writing the book and that it was a project he felt that was always in him. The writing process took about three years. Silent Siren is self published.

We conclude the episode with Matthew’s advice for aspiring authors. He encouraged writers to “look for deeper meaning of their experiences.” Matthew shared some of his favorite EMS authors, including George Steffensen, Peter Canning, and Kelly Grayson (links are to episodes of the Medical Author Chat with these authors).

Silent Siren is available from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Create Space, and his website.

Free Book Friday: Paramedic On the Jobs in the Headlines

Paramedic On the Jobs in the Headlines (Amazon link), the 2nd book from paramedic and author George Steffensen is available for free download for Amazon Prime subscribers.

The book description from Amazon.com:

Paramedic Steffensen 24 years on the streets gives you his first hand accounts of calls that made the headlines. Steffensen a retired N.Y.C. medic currently working in Baton Rouge will bring you onto the scenes of these major events. The World Trade Center 9/11/01, Helicoper down in East River, Murder at City Hall, Hurricane Gustav along with other events which made the headlines.

George is also the author of Buff to Burnt (my review) and a previous guest on the Medical Author Chat podcast.

Amazon pricing is always subject to change. Confirm before making your purchase. 

Podcast: Interview with Perry Prete author of All Good Things

In this episode of the Medical Author Chat I talk with Paramedic and author Perry Prete about his novel, All Good Things a novel (amazon affiliate link). Perry has been a paramedic since 1982 in Ontario and also owns Sands Medical Supply. Perry overviews the plot of All Good Things (murder/sieral killer crime fiction), his writing process, and the positive feedback he has received on the book so far.

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Perry comments that the book has been a “good way to share with the public what paramedics do.” All the calls/jobs in the book are based on reality and the calls Perry has worked in his career.

All Good Things is published by General Store Publishing and Perry praises the support he has received during the writing/editing process and book marketing. All Good Things is being well received by a non-EMS audience as well as paramedics.

We conclude the episode with Perry’s advice for aspiring paramedic authors. He states, “Just start! Anyway you can start writing. If you have it in you it will be hard to stop.”

The main characters of All Good Things, Ethan and Tom, will reappear in a forthcoming second book, The More Things Change, and Perry already has a second book in progress.

Links:

Book Review: You Called 9-1-1 for What?

In the new Kindle ebook  You Called 9-1-1 for What? (amazon affiliate link) Dave Konig an experienced New York City EMT writes a quick and entertaining look at the 911 system that serves the United States. A brief history of the system’s design and development is interspersed with transcripts from actual 911 calls. As a paramedic I was amused but not surprised by the myriad of absurd reasons citizens call 911. Lay readers (people that are not paramedics, firefighters, or police officers) will have an increased appreciation for the tedium and emotional drain that comes from interacting with the not so bright among us.

EMS and fire readers will probably find more information and value in Dave’s book Official Guide to Blogging for EMS.

Read another review of You Called 9-1-1 for What? on the EduMedic blog.

Disclaimer: I received a review copy of You Called 9-1-1 for What? from the author.

Book Announcement: All Good Things by Paramedic Perry Prete

Paramedic Perry Prete wrote me that his first novel, All Good Things (Amazon affiliate link) has been published. The book is about a paramedic “embroiled in a series of murders” (book description from http://openbookontario.com/news/dirty_dozen_perry_prete).

If you read All Good Things make sure you leaving a rating and review for Perry on Amazon. I am sure he would appreciate it.

Listen to the Medical Author Chat episode with Perry Prete.

Book Reviews and Announcements: Mid Summer 2012

Book Reviews

Paramedic: On the Front Lines of Medicine on the EduMedic Blog

Please Don’t Dance on my Ambulance on the EduMedic Blog

A Never Event on the Everyday EMS Tips Blog

The Downwind Walk on the High Performance EMS Blog

Currently Reading

How Winning Works by Firefighter/EMT and adventure racer Robyn Benincasa

Resurrecting the Street about the impacts of 9/11 and subsequent recovery of the financial services industry

Book Finds

New book from Michael Perry, Visiting Tom: A Man, a Highway, and the Road to Roughneck Grace. Michael was a guest on this episode of the Medical Author Chat podcast.

You Cant Park There: the highs and lows of an Air Ambulance Doctor

I heard about this book on Episode 5 of the Harris CPD podcast. The host asks the author for his advice on writing a book of memoirs.

Interview: 2 Weeks a Year Author Trent Cherin


In this episode of the Medical Author Chat Trent Cherin tells us about his book 2 Weeks a Year: Finding Humor while Deployed in Iraq which is about his deployment to Iraq as an Army National Guard Medic. Unlike most authors being a medic wasn’t something Trent did full-time. Rather it was something he did away from his normal work because he enjoyed helping others and being part of the National Guard. He describes being a medic as “a nice break.”

2 Weeks a Year is a chronicle of Trent’s 548 total days of deployment. Much of which he spent on a base in Iraq just north of Baghdad. The book was put together from photos and emails he sent to family and friends during his deployment. He also wrote the book as a way to remember his experience.

EMS Week Special: Trent is graciously offering a free download of 2 Weeks a Year from Amazon for the Kindle e-reader or Kindle app during EMS Week 2012. This download is only available from midnight Sunday to midnight Tuesday. Make sure to take advantage of this opportunity to download the book.

Connect with Trent on Twitter.com/trent1k1 or LinkedIn.com.